Filleting scalloping and chamfering corners

You can shape an object by filleting, scalloping, or chamfering corners. Filleting produces a rounded corner, scalloping rounds and inverts the corner to create a notch, and chamfering bevels a corner so that it appears flat.

Scalloped Circle Corel Draw

The cabinet doors have different styles applied to the corners. From left to right you can see standard corners with no changes, filleted corners, scalloped corners, and chamfered corners.

You can fillet, scallop, or chamfer the corners of any curve object — whether it originates from a shape, lines, text, or bitmap. If you select a shape that has not been converted to curves, a dialog box appears and gives you the option of converting the shape automatically. Text objects must be converted to curves manually by using the Convert to curves command. Changes apply to all corners unless you select individual nodes. You cannot fillet, scallop, or chamfer a smooth or symmetrical curve; the corner must be created by two lines that intersect at an angle of less than 180 degrees.

If a fillet, scallop, or chamfer value is too high, the operation is not applied to some or all of the corners. This occurs when line segments aren't long enough to apply the radius or chamfer distance. Even if the line segments appear long enough at the beginning of the operation, you must consider that the line segments shorten as the radius or chamfer values are applied across the object.

Fillet Radius

In the example above, the circles represent fillet radius settings. The upper lines show the proposed fillets on the left and the successful results on the right. The lower lines also show the proposed fillets on the left, but the results on the right show that not all corners are filleted. After the first fillet is applied, the next corner can't be filleted because the line segment isn't long enough. This corner is skipped, and the final corner is filleted.

In the example above, the circles represent fillet radius settings. The upper lines show the proposed fillets on the left and the successful results on the right. The lower lines also show the proposed fillets on the left, but the results on the right show that not all corners are filleted. After the first fillet is applied, the next corner can't be filleted because the line segment isn't long enough. This corner is skipped, and the final corner is filleted.

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Responses

  • furuta
    Can you fillet a bitmap in corel?
    8 years ago
  • mehret
    What is a fillet radius?
    8 years ago

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