Text effects

Figure 10.4

Text uses Reverse-Out, shadow is green and blurred.

Figure 10.3

Text uses Reverse-Out method.

Corel Text Effects

Figure 10.5

Text in Difference method, shadow using Colorize.

Figure 10.5

Text in Difference method, shadow using Colorize.

The Text Palette, shown in Figure 10.6, gives you most of the Property Bar choices and more. Here's where you'll adjust tracking (letter spacing) and leading (line spacing) and assign a curve style. There doesn't seem to be a way to kern (fine-tune spacing between two letters).

Caution

If you're familiar with Photoshop's nifty Warp Text feature, prepare to be disappointed by Painter's version of text on a curve. There are only three styles, and the curves must be edited with the Shape Selector tool. If you're a skilled manipulator of vector-type anchor points and direction lines, you might be okay.

Rasterize Me!

Figure 10.6

Don't let me catch you kids kerning!

Figure 10.6

Don't let me catch you kids kerning!

Text occupies its own special layer, clearly marked with the T icon, as shown in Figure 10.7. You can keep going back to change the font and any other text attributes as long as you keep the text in this editable state. When you attempt to apply brush strokes or use any commands outside the Text Palette, Painter will ask if you want to commit the text to an image layer. If you agree, your text is converted to ordinary pixels. That's called rasterizing.

We made a chunky chocolate bar in Lesson 7 using two Dynamic Plugin layers in tandem: Tear and Bevel. Similar effects can be applied to letterforms once they are rasterized. This time we'll use Burn and Bevel to transform an ordinary letter into an eroded sculptural piece, evoking an ancient mysterious realm. Game designers might see some possibilities here. Figure 10.8 has the freshly typed letter in a font called Gadget. I chose a rather hefty sans serif typeface, knowing that some destruction would still leave enough of it intact. Follow along using a similar typeface, such as Arial Black, Charcoal, or Futura.

Choose Burn from the Dynamic Plugins at the bottom of your Layers Palette. The settings I used are shown in Figure 10.9 for the effect in Figure 10.10. Your settings may vary, depending on the font you're using.

Figure 10.7

I said I'm editable, not edible.

Figure 10.7

I said I'm editable, not edible.

Figure 10.8

Burn Options

ri ^ |(r ___

1 -"X

n , -, «1 Z

2

n

Jaggsdness

- 50«

_ Use paper texture

Burn interior edges Preview

Crfi

_ Use paper texture

Burn interior edges Preview

Crfi

Figure 10.8

Figure 10.9

Burn, baby, burn!

Refer to the settings in Figure 10.11 for the bevel effect in Figure 10.12. I also added a drop shadow.

Me and My Shadow

You might have noticed that the External Shadow available for text behaves differently from the Drop Shadow you can add to an image layer. A drop shadow exists on its own layer and can be manipulated separately, independent of its more solid counterpart.

Corel Painter Layer Shadow

Figure 10.10

Jagged and ragged.

Figure 10.10

Jagged and ragged.

Figure 10.12

Rough and rugged.

Figure 10.11

Bevel, baby, bevel!

Figure 10.12

Rough and rugged.

When text is rasterized you can paint on it, fill it with a gradient, pattern or texture, push it, pull it, and stomp on it. Some of those options will be inflicted upon the letter "B" for a change. Figure 10.13 shows the before version, and Figure 10.14 demonstrates what can happen when good people use too many effects.

Figure 10.13

Innocent B-standers.

Figure 10.13

Innocent B-standers.

for fontfreaks

You'll no doubt recognize (from left to right) American Typewriter, Capitals, and Arial Black. Other fonts are fine for the following exercises.

Figure 10.14

F-X frenzy.

Figure 10.14

F-X frenzy.

I certainly don't want to encourage you to torture type, but I do want to explain the cool techniques used here. The shower door effect on the purple B is the result of applying Effects > Focus > Glass Distortion. I chose to use Basic Paper as the source of luminosity variation.

The B with a cast shadow was more complicated to create. The seashell images look like a Pattern fill, but they were actually made by spraying with the Image Hose. Next, I used Effects > Objects > Drop Shadow. With the letter and its shadow on separate layers, they could be tilted in different directions with Orientation > Distort. Figure 10.15 has part of the Layers Palette with the B and Shadow group open.

Notice there is a Layer Mask on the Shadow layer. It was needed to reduce the opacity of the shadow gradually as it got farther away from the base of the letter. We used a Layer Mask in Lesson 8 to make a gradual transition between two layers. This time the transition is between the shadow and the white canvas. Recall that black areas on a Layer Mask create complete transparency or invisibility for the image on the layer, while white produces 100% opacity, with shades of gray having intermediate effects. A two-point linear gradient was selected using Black and White, with the angle shown in Figure 10.16. Then it was applied to the Layer Mask with the Paint Bucket.

Now we come to the melting, disintegrating letter. First I filled it with Blobs from the Esoterica group in the Effects menu. Yes, the same blobs we used in the Chocolate section of Lesson 7. The real fun begins when you use a Dynamic Plugin called Liquid Lens. You'll need your Wacom tablet for this part. Liquid Lens controls, shown in Figure 10.17, remain open while you work. There are several items for distorting an image in a fluid way. I like the Brush tool for dragging pixels around. That's how the dripping icicles (or whatever) were made. There's no Undo available, but that eraser icon represents a tool for restoring or reverting pixels to their original condition. Partial restoration can produce some intriguing effects. As with all dynamic layers, changes can be made later, and (very important) no harm is being done to the layer beneath. To see what I mean, turn off the visibility of the Liquid Lens layer and you'll see the pristine pre-warp image.

Figure 10.15

B and my shadow.

Figure 10.15

B and my shadow.

Figure 10.16

That's two points for you.

Figure 10.16

That's two points for you.

I prefer using this kind of distortion on faces rather than defenseless members of the alphabet. Try it on images in the People > Heads folder on the CD, members of your family, or high-ranking government officials.

Warp,

Restore

Distort

Bulge

Twirl

Pinch

Bulge

Twirl

Pinch

Warp,

Restore

Distort

Figure 10.17

The Rain button makes acid rain.

Figure 10.17

The Rain button makes acid rain.

Distortion Is Where You find It

Several of the Liquid Lens tools are similar to variants in the Distortion brush category. Distorto, Pinch, and Bulge are pretty much the same. The Twirl tools are cousins of the Turbulence brush variant. The big difference, of course, is that you can restore pixels selectively only with the dynamic Liquid Lens layer.

Album Cover

Work along with me on a real-world illustration assignment. The client is a jazz pianist and composer who is putting together his first album and commissioned me to create the cover art. I took photographs of Gary playing in a couple of venues. One of those source photos is shown in Figure 10.18. There are several more in the Lesson 10 folder.

Preliminary Sketches

It's customary for an illustrator or designer to make quick "thumbnail" (small) sketches or layouts as the first step. Well, maybe the second step, after a discussion about what the client wants. Digital "sketches" can include quick surface or tonal effects and layered images combined with different composite methods. This part of the process can be fun because your creativity is free to roam. Follow a theme or branch off in another direction, or both. It's so easy to make multiple variations on an image digitally, Just remember to use Iterative Save so the flow of ideas won't be interrupted. And don't overwhelm your client by displaying all the possibilities— just two or three of your best efforts!

Figure 10.18

Jazz man.

Figure 10.18

Jazz man.

The effect in Figure 10.19 begins with a loose Lasso selection of the background. Select > Feather the selection by about 15 pixels for a smooth transition, then use Effects > Focus > Soften for the blur. Invert the selection and apply Effects > Surface Control > Distress using Grain (Paper) to Gary and the piano. I chose Small Dots paper, and I like the crisp black-and-white halftone look, especially in contrast to the soft sepia tones of the blurry background. I had never used the Distress effect before, but it sounded interesting.

Express Texture sounds interesting, too, and it's also in the Surface Control menu. Go back to the original photo and choose Select > All, then Paste in Place to make a copy of the image on its own layer. This step will facilitate the combining of two effects. I applied the Impressionist Color Scheme to the canvas image, then Express Texture using Paper on the layer copy. Figure 10.20 shows the Express Texture dialog with a preview of the Pebble Board effect, a very bold texture that I reduced to about 25% of its scale, using a slider in the Papers Palette. I ended up using Basic Paper instead.

Choosing Screen from the Composite Method list softens the impressionist color scheme and still retains enough grainy texture. This combination appears in Figure 10.21. There are many possible blends of different color schemes with a black-and-white texture, using alternate composite methods. Considering the variety of paper choices available, exploring them could keep you busy for hours.

Figure 10.19

In distress.

Figure 10.19

In distress.

Figure 10.22 is a pencil drawing made from that source image in Painter, using the classic technique of working on gray paper with dark lines and white highlights. Here are the steps to get you started.

1. Choose medium gray for the main color and use the Set Paper Color command in the Canvas menu.

2. Make a Quick Clone of the photo. The background color will be medium gray.

3. Increase opacity of tracing paper to about 70% (version X) so you see only enough of the source to guide you.

4. Draw with the Cover Pencil or another fine-line pencil or pen that uses the Cover method.

Figure 10.22

Do you take requests?

Figure 10.22

Do you take requests?

Head for Cover

Why do we need a Pencil variant using the Cover method for this drawing? Because we want to be able to make white marks on a gray background. Most of the Pencil variants use the Buildup method because that is the way traditional pencils function. You can change the method of any variant in the General section of Brush Controls.

V"

Figure 10.23 has an early stage in this drawing, with an inset showing how the image looks with tracing paper opacity turned up to 80%. You can complete the black line sketch before you add white strokes or switch freely between black and white as you develop the drawing. Although this piece was only an experiment, Gary liked it enough to use it in a performance announcement. The "blues" version is shown at the beginning of the lesson. I added the color using a new layer filled with solid blue, then changed the composite method to Colorize. This kept the white and black untouched and just changed the gray areas.

An Art Background

The photo in Figure 10.24 has a different look, mainly due to the contrast of the bright abstract painting with the nearly monochromatic foreground. A painterly approach seems called for. I thought some Color Scheme variations might provide inspiration. The Modern Color Scheme resulted in a higher contrast between Gary and the white wall, which works nicely.

Figure 10.23

Two pianos, four hands.

Figure 10.23

Two pianos, four hands.

Figure 10.24

Jazz in a gallery.

Figure 10.24

Jazz in a gallery.

With A Jazz Gallery as the working title for this album, the abstract painting suggests using images derived from modern art paintings. This client has considerable knowledge of fine art from various periods, so he liked the idea of using visual references to paintings created around the time jazz was developing. The obvious place for a title is in the black area of the jacket. I'm using a font called Matisse, perfect for evoking the period and style. It will be easy to change the typeface, color, or position of this text later.

We won't use the specific painting in the photo, so let's eliminate it using some careful erasing around Gary's head followed by a Lasso selection of the remaining painting. The Delete/Backspace key gets rid of that. (Make it easier on your wrist by tilting your canvas with the Rotate Page tool.) Clean up the photo even more by taking out the microphone and whatever is on top of the piano. The image at this stage, in Figure 10.25, is ready for some jazzy artwork to be added to that white wall.

Figure 10.25

Gary cleans up real nice.

Figure 10.25

Gary cleans up real nice.

Copyright and Wrong

If you incorporate other people's work in your images without permission, be sure to change it significantly. That should protect you from a lawsuit for copyright infringement. See the Appendix for more on the topic of intellectual property.

We'll be placing three images into the background, and it would make our cutting and pasting more efficient if we could keep those images from overlapping onto Gary and the piano. This will take a few steps.

1. Make a Magic Wand selection of the clean white background. Add the brownish bits of floor to the selection by holding down the Shift key while you click in each of those areas.

2. Invert the selection so Gary and the piano are surrounded by marching ants.

3. Use the Save Selection command in the Selection menu. You'll have to name it, so call it "foreground."

4. Copy and paste a new image for the background. If it overlaps the foreground, use Load Selection and delete the unwanted pixels.

Your saved selection can be made active any time. Wondering where selections are stored? Take a look at the Channels Palette, shown in Figure 10.26, along with the full-size image with the new alpha channel visible, but the RGB (full-color) image is invisible. A channel works like a Layer Mask and can be edited by painting with black, white, or shades of gray.

You might need to see the RGB image in order to improve the accuracy of a channel. When both are visible, the channel shows up as translucent red. Repairs are still made by painting with black or white. In Figure 10.27, you see a section of the image before and after improvement.

Figure 10.26

Quiet! I'm channeling.

Figure 10.26

Quiet! I'm channeling.

full Disclosure

The task of pasting images into an irregular shape is much easier in Photoshop, using a dandy command called Paste Into, meaning paste into the selection. This automatically creates a Layer Mask, as well as a new channel. The pasted image can be moved around within the selected area until you decide where you want it positioned. If you don't have Photoshop to fall back on for some sophisticated image manipulation chores, Painter can usually muddle through. I gotta tell it like it is.

Figure 10.27

A close shave.

I chose the three images shown in Figure 10.28 to decorate the wall behind Gary. From left to right, they are a Diego Rivera, a Picasso, and a portion of a Kandinsky. Rather than have them as three images hanging separately, I plan to blend them into a mural. Figure 10.29 shows the elements in place, after some color manipulation. I applied a Chalk Drawing Color Scheme to the Rivera and increased contrast. I really like the cubist lute player by Picasso but wanted to punch up the color. The Impressionist Color Scheme did the trick. The only change made to the Kandinsky fragment was with Effects > Orientation > Distort to make it fit that odd space on the right.

Figure 10.28

Rivera had a cubist period, too.

Figure 10.28

Rivera had a cubist period, too.

Figure 10.29

Three easy pieces.

Figure 10.29

Three easy pieces.

To Smear, Perhaps to Clone

After all that preparation, we're finally ready to do some painting! I used Smeary Varnish from the Impasto category for the look of thick paint with bristly brush strokes. Recall using this brush in Lesson 5 on a portrait study and also in Lesson 8 when we created an abstract painting and again in the animation lesson working with the Muybridge dancer sequence. I like this variant a lot.

There is a detail showing a section of the image before and after smearing in Figure 10.30. Use short strokes in a variety of directions, mostly following the shapes, but also deliberately blending hard edges and dragging color from one area to another. This stage can be pushed further, but don't obliterate the original art completely.

The stage shown in Figure 10.31 is ready to show the client. I hope he likes the contrast between the painterly sections and the untouched photograph. The fact that his head is a painting while his hands are realistic implies a combination of styles in his music.

I'll also show him a variation or two with a different surface texture. The detail section in Figure 10.32 is the result of Effects > Surface Control > Apply Surface Texture using Paper, with Coarse Cotton Canvas selected from the Paper library. This minimizes the Impasto brush work. If the texture is too strong, use Edit > Fade to reduce it

Figure 10.30

Unvarnished and varnished truth.

Figure 10.32

Canvassing the area.

Figure 10.30

Unvarnished and varnished truth.

Figure 10.31

Ready for client feedback.

Figure 10.32

Canvassing the area.

Figure 10.31

Ready for client feedback.

free-Style Cloning

There are no official steps for this event. Just use your favorite Cloner variants. Some of them can cover previous cloned strokes, but others must be applied to a clean area to work effectively. The Pencil Sketch Cloner, for example, needs to work on a blank area because its look relies on leaving some white spaces. Erase or delete areas as needed to redo with a different style.

I changed the background wall just a bit for the following version. The Picasso now has its original color scheme, and I switched to different Rivera and Kandinsky paintings.

Let's take another approach to the prepared collage. The painting introducing this lesson was created with a technique we can call "mixed media cloning." That is, using several Cloner variants to produce a painting with a variety of textures and brush strokes.

I began with the Spattery Clone Spray, which creates the speckled pointillist look of 19th-century painter Georges Seurat, very similar to the effect you would get if you used Clone Color with the Seurat variant in the Artists brush category. This stage is shown in Figure 10.33. Seurat lived and worked well before the jazz age, but why quibble? I'd rather scribble! That's why I chose the Pencil Sketch Cloner to redo several areas. The Oil Brush Cloner was used here and there for a few bristly brush strokes.

Unlike a fine art piece, it's easier to know when you're finished with an illustration assignment. The client tells you.

Figure 10.33

Play something neo-impressionist.

Figure 10.33

Play something neo-impressionist.

In these few pages, you'll find some recommendations useful for continuing with digital painting after you're finished with this book. But first, there are a few things to discuss that will get you off on the right foot, if it's not too late.

Pixels versus Vectors

I mentioned early on that Painter and Photoshop are pixel-based. The word pixel is short for picture element, using the common abbreviation "pix" for "picture." Each pixel represents a tiny colored dot or square, and with enough of them lined up horizontally and vertically, you'll get the picture. Resolution, measured in pixels per inch (or ppi), tells you about the quality of the image. A resolution of 300 ppi has a much finer grain and more detail than the same image at 72 ppi. Resolution is especially important when images are prepared for printing. Pixel-based (also called raster or bitmap) images must include information on the color and location of every single one of those pixels. Depending on the dimensions and resolution, there can be thousands of such pixels in an image, resulting in hefty file sizes. For example, a Painter or Photoshop file that's 8" x 10" at 300 ppi weighs in at 20 MB. The larger the file size, the more RAM is needed and the harder your computer has to work. Older machines can really start huffing and puffing.

By contrast, vector-based programs, like Flash and Illustrator, are resolution-independent and have the advantage of smaller files because the image elements this time are not pixels but paths with simple fills and strokes (outlines) that can be stored as mathematical instructions. By their nature, vector-based images tend to have hard-edged lines with no thickness variation and flat color fills, whereas pixel-based graphics can have the kind of variation (called continuous tone) seen in photos and paintings. Working with pixels is intuitive and natural, but it takes considerable practice to get skilled at placing the anchor points and adjusting the curves that make up vector shapes.

The eyes in Figure A.1 show you the difference between pixels and vectors rather dramatically. The photo is zoomed in so you can see some pixels up close and personal. Some smears with a Blender variant made the painterly version, and it's obvious which eye was made with vector shapes. There are pros and cons to each approach, and you don't have to restrict yourself to just one or the other. If you're not sure which category you prefer, ask yourself if you'd rather have precision or instant gratification. Do you like being able to create clean, sharp lines or juicy, smeary ones? I knew I was a pixel-packin' mama from the start!

Appendix A fundamentals ai

Can't We Just Get Along?

Pixel pushers can have access to some of the benefits of Vector World. In Lesson 6 you got the opportunity to work with Painter's Shapes feature. You can even open Adobe Illustrator (version 8) files that are in .ai or .eps (encapsulated postscript) format and see each shape in your Layers Palette. Of course, these vector images must be converted to pixels, or rasterized, which sounds much more exotic.

Figure A.1

To smear or not to smear—that is the question!

Take Two Tablets and Call Me in the Morning

Actually, only one graphics tablet is needed, no matter how many computers you may have. If you're shopping around for a tablet, I'll make things easier for you. Wacom Technologies is the only manufacturer to consider, and I'm not getting any kickbacks.

Digital Painting fundamentals with Corel Painter X

inte

They make a range of tablets in several sizes for every budget and work situation, from the petite entry level 4" x 5" Graphire for $100 to the $2500 Cintiq, which is actually a monitor you can draw on. (If you can simply learn to look up at your regular screen while your pen is working down below on your desk or in your lap you can save $2400! Just look at the cursor to see where to paint. See, doesn't that prove I'm not on the Wacom payroll?)

It's easy to use a pen tablet because every point on the tablet has a matching point on the screen. When you move your pen over the tablet, the cursor moves in precisely the same way on the screen. Where you touch your pen tip to the tablet is where you click. If you need to establish or customize this "mapping" relationship, use Wacom Tablet preferences, shown in Figure A.2. This is the Mac version, found in System Preferences. The way to find Wacom prefs on a PC is as follows: click on the Start button > All Programs > Wacom Tablet Folder > Wacom Tablet Properties. These are the default settings for mapping. Notice that Pen mode is selected rather than Mouse mode. That's very important to assure the point-to-point matching of screen and tablet. You can actually specify different settings for different applications.

Figure A.2

Tablet Mapping settings.

Figure A.2

Tablet Mapping settings.

Appendix A fundamentals a

Figure A.3 shows a portion of the preferences pane with the settings available for your Wacom pen. Several variables can be adjusted to customize pen behavior, including choices for the click functions of the lever on the side of some pen barrels.

Figure A.3

Wacom Pen settings.

Figure A.3

Wacom Pen settings.

The Graphire tablet shown in Figure A.4 is being used for tracing an image placed under the transparent frame that comes with all tablets. This particular model is Bluetooth capable, so no pesky cord is required. You get a cordless mouse, too.

Figure A.4

Drawing hand sold separately.

Figure A.4

Drawing hand sold separately.

My personal choice is the mid-range Intuos series, which has more levels of pressure sensitivity than a Graphire tablet. My preferred size is the very portable 6" x 8", and there are several sizes all the way up to 12" x 19". Every Wacom tablet comes bundled with Painter Essentials, the "lite" version of Corel Painter, as well as with Photoshop Elements, the stripped down version of that other pixel-based program. So you'll probably need a copy of my previous book, Fun with Photoshop Elements (I haven't seen a royalty check for a while).

The Wacom Web site, www.wacom.com, is as user friendly as can be, offering you help in deciding which tablet is best for you, downloads for updating drivers (software), technical support, and even a Tips and Tricks section for users of Painter, Photoshop, and Flash.

What's Your Preference?

I've already mentioned a couple of important items under Corel Painter > Preferences, especially Brush Tracking. That's where you make a test stroke to set the tablet's sensitivity to your touch. Use it when you begin a work session and anytime you feel the need for an adjustment. This is much easier and faster than using the Wacom Tablet preferences.

The General Preferences panel, shown in Figure A.5, has several settings you'll want to customize sooner or later (the sooner the better for Units). It's set at Pixels by default, but I just can't help thinking in inches, so that's what I pick. You Europeans and other civilized folks can choose centimeters. There are points and picas for you typesetters and columns for you neo-classical architects.

With Brush Ghosting enabled, the cursor becomes the shape of your current brush tip, and Enhanced Brush Ghosting (Painter X) shows the angle and direction of your pen. These options can slow you down if you're using some of the more complex brushes and your computer isn't on steroids. While your brush is moving, what do you want the drawing cursor to look like? Several choices are here, from a tiny triangle to a tiny brush icon, with color options and a choice of orientation to accommodate either your handedness or your lifestyle.

Appendix A fundamentals an

Figure A.5

Cursors and units and more.

Figure A.5

Cursors and units and more.

As for Quick Clone (Painter IX and X), accept the defaults, enabling all three options. That's what makes it Quick. And if you're into quickness, you might want to change Brush Size Increment to two or three pixels so that when you use the bracket keys ([ ]) to reduce or enlarge your brush size on the fly, changes will be made more quickly. All the other default settings seem sensible, so don't change them until you feel the need.

Different Strokes

Another excellent way to increase speed and efficiency (if you're into that sort of thing) is to learn the keyboard shortcuts for the most frequently used commands. Some of these are specific to Painter, but most are used by all programs, so you might know them already. A couple of modifier keys are different for Mac versus PC users. On the Windows platform, the Ctrl key corresponds to the Command key on a Mac (that's the key with the Apple logo and the thing that looks like a four-leaf clover with an eating disorder). The Alt key on a PC is the equivalent of the Option key for Mac users. There are a few other differences, like Delete serving the same purpose as Backspace on a Mac.

Get Off My Intellectual Property!

Here's some free legal advice, and I assure you it's worth every penny.

If you scan images printed in books or magazines or search the Web for digital pictures, be aware that such items might be copyright protected. That's not a problem unless you want to publish your edited versions. Copyright law gives the original creator of an image all rights to it, including derivations thereof (or is it "wherefrom"?). How much would you have to change an image to make it legally your own and not just a derivation? Are you willing to go to court to find out?

When it comes to using the likeness of a celebrity, things can get complicated. Are you infringing on the copyright of the subject or the photographer who created the photo? Maybe both. Famous people have the right of publicity to prevent others from making money with their likeness, even after death. On the other hand, ordinary folks have the right to privacy, so you need to get a "model release" signed before you can legally publish their faces.

There are exceptions to copyright protection, called fair use. For example, you can publish doctored images of famous people for satirical purposes. Copyright expires 70 years after the death of the creator (last time I checked), after which the image becomes public domain, so anything goes. An image like the Mona Lisa is way in the public domain, even though the actual painting is owned by the Louvre in Paris. Ownership of a piece of art is completely separate from usage rights thereto. The images made available to you on the CD that comes with this book are provided only for your personal use in working on the projects. All other rights are reserved by the copyright holders.

Appendix A fundamentals and Beyond

Table A.1 Keyboard Shortcuts

Menu Command

Mac

PC

File > New

Cmd+N

Ctrl+N

File > Open

Cmd+O

Ctrl+O

File > Save

Cmd+S

Ctrl+S

File > Save As

Shift+Cmd+S

Shift+Ctrl+S

File > Iterative Save

Option+Cmd+S

Alt+Ctrl+S

File > Close

Cmd+W

Ctrl+W

File > Print

Cmd+P

Ctrl+P

Edit > Undo

Cmd+Z

Ctrl+Z

Edit > Copy

Cmd+C

Ctrl+C

Edit > Paste

Cmd+V

Ctrl+V

Select > All

Cmd+A

Ctrl+A

Select > None (Deselect)

Cmd+D

Ctrl+D

Select > Hide/Show Marquee

Shift+Cmd+H

Shift+Ctrl+H

Window > Zoom In

Cmd+ (plus sign)

Ctrl+ (plus sign)

Window > Zoom Out

Cmd+ (minus sign)

Ctrl+ (minus sign)

Window > Zoom to Fit

Cmd+0 (zero)

Ctrl+0 (zero)

Window > Screen Mode Toggle

Cmd+M

This section suggests sources for more training, images to play with, media to print on, and even places to display your work to other digital painters.

If you have an Internet connection, there is instant access to online tutorials and the Painter community from your Help menu. Choose Help > Tutorials to learn from such Painter luminaries as John Derry, one of the original creators of the program. Help > The Corel Classroom takes you to The Painter Canvas eNewsletter, where you can sign up for this free monthly "forum for Painter aficionados to learn new tips and techniques, to share and download custom brushes and product freebies, and to discuss all things Painter."

Browse through a few back issues in The Painter Canvas archives, then click on the Resources button in the menu strip. When you get to that page, click on Books, CDs, and DVDs to see what else is available to continue your Painter training.

When you launch Painter IX or X, don't be so quick to dismiss the Welcome screen. Use the tabs along the edges of the "open book" format to get help, encouragement, and a peek at the work of other Painter artists. The Extra Content tab, shown in Figure A.6, has a link to online tips and tricks that give you more insight into features and techniques that I might have left out or glossed over. The bottom tab, Painter on the Net, sends you to a series of Quick Tips that simply tell you what a feature does and how to access it.

Figure A.6

You're welcome.

Figure A.6

You're welcome.

Appendix A fur imentals imentals

Finding Images

If you enjoyed working with the stop-motion photos by Muybridge in Lesson 9, you might want to buy the entire collection from Dover Publications. There are two slim volumes, Muybridge's Animals in Motion and Muybridge's Human Figure in Motion, that provide not only a printed catalog showing each photo sequence but all images on a CD as electronic clip art. For only $14.95 ($22.50 Canadian), you get enough raw material to keep rotoscoping for years. Are these images royalty-free and in the public domain? You betcha—Muybridge died in 1904.

Way Beyond Disney

I mentioned the dancing hippos from Disney's 1940 film Fantasia when I introduced rotoscope animation. There are more recent and much more exciting examples. The Beatles' Yellow Submarine (1968) used the rotoscope technique in the "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" sequence. Brilliant colors and brush work change every few frames for a gorgeous, splashy effect that's breathtaking even if you're not taking a psychedelic substance. A much darker, gothic style is used in the rotoscoped portions of Ralph Bakshi's highly original Wizards (1977). Finally, Richard Linklater's sci-fi thriller, A Scanner Darkly (2006), is a rotoscope tour de force—every frame was drawn and painted from live action footage, yielding effects that would be impossible any other way.

You'll probably want to shoot most of your own source photos, but when you need a variety of images or something unusual in a hurry, use the Internet. If you don't mind low resolution and are careful about possible copyright issues, use Google's search engine. When you get to the Google home page at www.google.com, click on Images instead of Web and type in what you're looking for. This is a great way to get visual references for accuracy or just browse for ideas.

There are commercial online sources for high-quality stock photography. They generally require payment of fees for specified usage, and their target market is professional designers and illustrators.

If you want a lot of images, those fees can really add up. For stock images with a liberal licensing agreement at bargain prices, my vote goes to ShutterStock.com. It's easy to use their Boolean search engine to find what you need quickly, and best of all, you can subscribe for a relatively small fee, considering the volume of images you'll get. One month of this service costs $200 last time I checked, and it allows you 25 images per day or a total of 750 photos for the month. That's less than 26 cents per image. Other companies can charge $200 for a single photo! Check it out at www.shutterstock.com.

Consider using your older (analog) photos. Take old snapshots out of the family album or the shoebox and digitize them. A basic scanner is pretty cheap and is a handy device to have around. If you want to digitize images found in books or magazine, your scanner should have a Descreen feature. This is needed to prevent an unsightly moiré pattern from the halftone dots used in process printing. Published images are almost certainly copyright protected (not a problem if you're just using them in the privacy of your own home and with consenting adults).

Printing

I've got an inexpensive Canon PIXMA ip1600 inkjet printer that I use for most of my letter-size printing. I can get spectacular results as long as I use high-quality paper or other media to print on. Ordinary paper is too porous, letting ink spread into the fibers, so images get blurry or muddy looking. This is as good a place as any to mention that it's practically impossible to print all the vibrant, saturated color that you see on your monitor. The colors on your screen have a wider gamut (range) than you can achieve with ink on paper. Given the gamut limitations that come with the territory, my choice for crisp rich color is glossy photo paper. Epson and HP make it, among others. It comes in various weights and can be glossy on both sides.

For wearable art, consider printing your images on iron-on transfers that can be applied to clothing, hats, or what-have-you. Avery makes inkjet magnet sheets, which I print with several small images (like the gesture drawings I showed you in Lesson 8). Then I trim them into shapes for some unique refrigerator magnets.

Archival-quality media are available for fine art printing from your desktop. A great resource is www.inkjetart.com, where you can find letter-size or larger canvas (glossy or matte), watercolor paper, and printable fabrics. If you know you'll print on canvas, you won't need to add an optical canvas texture to the artwork.

Appendix A fundamentals and Beyond

If you want to print BIG but don't want to invest in a large format printer, order from an outfit like Imagers (www.imagers.com/ poster.html). Visit their Web site for a price list of poster sizes from 18" x 24" to 59" x 96" printed on photo paper, film, vinyl, or canvas. Another company, youHuge.com, offers poster-size prints that can be mounted on foam core or other boards. Check them out at www.youhuge.com/large_format_posters.htm.

Fonts

After using the Text tool for a while, you might get a hankering for more exciting typefaces than just the ones factory installed on your computer. Lots of fonts are available free for personal (non-commercial) use. They can be downloaded from sites like Larabie Fonts (www.larabiefonts.com) or Blue Vinyl fonts (www.bvfonts.com). Use your favorite search engine to find more font resources on the Web. When I entered "free fonts" in a Google search and clicked the I'm Feeling Lucky button, what came up was the site The Ultimate Font Download (www.1001 freefonts.com). This is a collection of 6,000 "quality fonts from award winning font designers" for both Windows and Mac OS X. You can download them all with one click. Okay, they're not quite free, but at $14.95, that's a sweet deal!

If you need a special font and are willing to pay a little more for it, there are quite a few possibilities. LetterHead Fonts specializes in rare and unique fonts for artists and designers, and it charges about $30 per font (www.letterheadfonts.com). The P22 Foundry (www.p22.com) proudly announces that it "creates computer typefaces inspired by Art, History, and sometimes Science ... renowned for its work with museums and foundations to ensure the development of accurate historical typefaces " Pretty impressive; and P22 fonts are available for as low as $19.95. Incidentally, many type houses still call themselves foundries, even though they hardly ever need to pour molten metal into molds anymore.

Fonthead Design (http://fonthead.com), sells distinctive display fonts in sets of about a dozen in volumes for $34 each. That's less than three bucks a font. Pretty good for such delights as Logjam, Shoestring, CatScratch, Cyber Monkey, and Croissant. Fonthead also offers a few freebies, including some whimsical fonts like Good Dog and SpillMilk, and a set of cartoon face dingbats (small decorative images or symbols) called Font Heads.

Dingbat Fonts Investment
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