Converting an image to a different color mode

CorelDRAW lets you convert an image to the following color modes: Black-and-White, Grayscale, Duotone, RGB, CMYK, or LAB. You can also convert a bitmap to the Paletted color mode. For information about Converting to Paletted color mode, see "Converting images to the Paletted color mode" on page 576.

An image is converted from the RGB color mode to the CMYK color mode.

An image is converted from the RGB color mode to the CMYK color mode.

The Black-and White, Duotone and Paletted color modes share common controls. For information on how to use these common controls, see "Using bitmap effects" on page 584.

Converting to the Black-and-White color mode

The Black-and-White color mode is a 1-bit color mode that stores images as two solid colors — usually black and white — with no gradations. This mode is useful for line art and simple graphics.

Converting to the Grayscale color mode

The Grayscale color mode uses 256 shades of gray to represent an image. Every pixel in a grayscale image has a brightness value ranging from 0, which is black, to 255, which is white. In some cases, you must convert an image to grayscale before you can convert it to other modes. For example, you must convert an image to the Grayscale color mode before you can convert it to the Duotone color mode.

Converting to the Duotone color mode

The Duotone color mode consists of the Grayscale color mode enhanced with one to four additional colors. The Duotone color mode adds color to grayscale images or creates effects using tone curve settings. A duotone image can be monotone, duotone, tritone, or quadtone, according to the number of additional colors.

Converting to the RGB Color color mode

The RGB Color color mode is a 24-bit color mode that uses percentages of three colors (red, green, and blue) to create colors. Each color has 100 levels of intensity, ranging from black to the color's full intensity. RGB Color is the most commonly used color mode.

You can use the RGB Color color mode to create high-quality photographic color bitmaps, and to print to an RGB or CMY printer.

Converting to the Lab Color color mode

The Lab Color color mode creates color based on luminance or lightness (L) and two chromatic components: "a" and "b." The "a" component consists of colors ranging from green to red and the "b" component consists of colors ranging from blue to yellow.

You can use the LAB Color color mode for working with Photo CD images or for editing the luminance and color values of an image independently. You can also use the Lab color mode to move images between systems and for printing to PostScript Level 2 printers.

Converting to the CMYK Color color mode

The CMYK Color color mode assigns each pixel in the original image a percentage value for each of the corresponding process inks. The lightest colors are assigned small percentage values and darker shades are assigned higher percentage values. You can use the CMYK Color color mode when you want to print an image that has process colors. The CMYK Color color mode is the standard mode for most full-color commercial printing.

Converting to the CMYK Color color mode is different from converting to other modes because it is used to produce full-color separations. The CMYK Color color mode is device-dependent, which means that its color space is based on the characteristics of a printer. If you convert an image to a device-dependent color mode such as CMYK Color, the color values used to produce the image might differ from one device to another.

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