Light Controls

Surface Texture is represented by light and shadow based on the image luminosity and the Light controls will change the direction, intensity, color, exposure and balance of the lighting. Figure 6.9 shows the light direction coming from the top left while in Figure 6.10 it is coming from the bottom right, which gives the frame a very different appearance.

Figure 6.9

Light direction top left.

Light direction bottom right.

Figure 6.9

Light direction top left.

Figure 6.10

Light direction bottom right.

The first option in the Using box uses Paper as the source of the texture. Paper textures can be used from any of the many paper libraries, so the choice of texture is huge.

Step File> Open> DVD> Step-by-step files> '06 Vase of Grasses'.

Step 2 Select Artists Canvas from the Papers palette.

Step 3 Effects> Apply Surface Texture. Step 4 Select Paper in the Using box and 68% in the Amount slider.

In the Preview square you will see the effect on the picture, click in the square to compare the before and after view. Before you click OK try some of the other settings and see their effect in the preview window.

While the dialog box is on screen you can use the Papers palette to change the texture and see the updated result immediately. Figure 6.12 shows the result at the 68% setting.

It is often difficult to assess the amount needed as the preview window is small, so it is usually better to make the amount fairly strong and then to go to Edit> Fade to reduce the strength. This option to fade an action is really useful to remember as it applies not only to this effect but also to many actions throughout Painter, including individual brush strokes. Figure 6.11 shows the Fade dialog box.

Another way of making textures crisper in a print is by applying sharpening to the picture. In Painter this can be done in the Effects menu. Effects> Focus> Sharpen.

Fguree.iy Vase with paper texture applied.

Figure 6.11

Fade dialog box.

Figure 6.11

Fade dialog box.

Fguree.iy Vase with paper texture applied.

The Image Luminance option bases the texture on the luminance or brightness of the image itself. In effect, this means that you are putting an embossing effect directly upon the picture. The effect is used to add depth and texture to a picture.

Step 1 File> Open> DVD> Step-by-step files> '06 Rose'. Step 2 File> Quick Clone.

Step 3 Select the Cloners> Soft Cloner, brush size 262.0 opacity 7% and make a soft clone as seen in Figure 6.14. Step 4 Effects> Surface Control> Apply Surface Texture. Select Image Luminance from the Using drop down menu and move the Amount slider to 30%. Leave the other settings on default. The picture will now have an embossed texture on top as can be seen in Figure 6.15.

Figure 6.13

photograph.

Original

Figure 6.14

Soft clone.

photograph.

Figure 6.15

Soft clone with embossing effect.

Figure 6.14

Soft clone.

Figure 6.15

Soft clone with embossing effect.

Figures 6.16 and 6.17 show another example of this setting, the texture in the old photograph album cover has been enhanced with the Image Luminance texture. This is quite difficult to appreciate printed at this size so the files are on the DVD.

Figure 6.16

Original photograph.

Figure 6.17

With added texture.

Original

Figure 6.18

Original

This option uses the original picture as the source of the texture and applies it to the clone copy. You must have the clone source active on the desktop and linked to the clone before the texture can be applied. The original and clone need not be the same picture as the texture can be taken from any open image by changing the clone source in the Edit menu.

Step 1 File> Open> DVD>Step-by-step files> '06 Edwardian Corner'. Step 2 File> Quick Clone.

Step 3 Select Cloners> Soft Cloner. Brush size 308.0 opacity 7% and make a soft clone as seen in Figure 6.19. Leave the edges clear so that you can see the effect clearly Step 4 Effects> Surface Control> Apply Surface Texture, select the Original Luminance option from the Using menu. Set the Amount at 20% and leave the other settings unchanged.

Figure 6.20 shows the result, look especially at the book and shelf support and you will see that an embossed texture has been created which is not present in the clone.

Figure 6.18

photograph.

photograph.

Figure 6.19

Soft clone.

Figure 6.19

Soft clone.

Figure 6.20

Clone with original luminance applied.

Figure 6.20

Clone with original luminance applied.

This final option compares the original picture with the clone and puts the texture on the difference between the two. This is a little difficult to imagine but it does give a very three-dimensional effect to the brush strokes, particularly when a rough brush and textured paper have been used. The illustrations below show the differences between the various options and by looking closely at the textures you will be see how each one can be used in a picture.

Figure 6.21

Original photograph.

Figure 6.22

Bristle Brush cloner.

Figure 6.21

Original photograph.

Figure 6.22

Bristle Brush cloner.

Figure 6.21 shows the original image before cloning. Figure 6.22 is the cloned image using the Bristle Brush Cloner.

Figure 6.23

Original luminance.

Figure 6.24

Image luminance.

Figure 6.23

Original luminance.

Figure 6.24

Image luminance.

Figure 6.23 has had the Original Luminance option applied, note how the harder lines of the original image have been superimposed over the softer clone. Compare this with Figure 6.24 which has used the Image Luminance option, the image is softer as the texture has reinforced the cloned detail.

Figure 6.25 uses thc three-dimensional Brush Strokes option and thc tcxturc is somewhere between the Original and the Image Luminance examples above. Figure 6.26 uses the Paper option on the clone copy, the paper used is Artists Canvas.

At the printed size shown here it may be difficult to see the subtle differences between these pictures, I have therefore added the examples to the DVD so that you can open the images up in Painter to see the detail better. They are under the name '6 AST' in the Step-by-step files folder.

Strokes.

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