Textured Clone

This step-by-step example will look at how to use paper textures when making clones. You will learn how to change the appearance of a photograph to give the impression of painting on a coarse textured paper. The range of paper textures and how to use them is explored in more detail in Chapters 5 and 6.

The photograph of St Conan's Kirk in FgUEElti^ Original photograph. Scotland had some simple repair work done in Photoshop prior to opening in Painter. The contrast was increased slightly and the blue sky was extended down to cover some eye-catching white clouds. It is not necessary to get this very precise, as the cloning process will cover up any minor imperfections.

Step 1 File> Open> DVD> Step-by-step files> '02StConan Kirk'.

Step 2 File> Ouick Clone. Step 3 Select the Brush icon in the Toolbox. Step 4 From the Brush Selector bar choose the Chalk category and select Square Chalk 35 as the Brush Variant. This brush is not in the Cloners brush category and therefore you will have to change it from the default setting, which is painting color, to cloning mode so that the brush picks up detail from the original image. This applies to all brush categories except Cloning and Smart Stroke. If the General palette is not on screen go to Window>Brush Controls> Show General. You will get all the Brush Control palettes on screen so click on the General palette heading and drag it out from the rest, you can then remove the other palettes which will not be needed from the screen by clicking on the X top right of the palette stack. Step 5 There are two controls to be adjusted to change this brush to work as a cloner. In the Method box change the setting to Cloning, this will make the brush use the original picture as the source for color. Then in the Subcategory box select Grainy Hard Cover Cloning, this will tell the brush to use the paper texture when painting.

i's

Figure 2.21

palette.

General

Figure 2.21

palette.

General

Figure 2.22

Papers palette.

Figure 2.22

Papers palette.

Step 6 Change the brush size to 35.0 and the Opacity to 5%. If you are using a mouse rather than a pressure sensitive pen I suggest you use 1% or 2% opacity, this will enable you to build up the textures more slowly. Step 7 You now need to choose a paper texture and if the papers palette is not on the screen go to Window> Library Palettes> Show Papers. Open the Papers palette and click on the small paper icon highlighted in Figure 2.22. This will reveal a drop down menu showing the Painter X default set of papers as shown in Figure 2.23. Select the Italian Watercolor Paper.

Step 8 Paint the main lines of the building with the tracing paper turned on. These initial marks should be very light and you will need to turn the tracing paper on and off many times to see what you have painted. Once you have all the main building areas indicated on the picture you can turn off the tracing paper. See Figure 2.24 for an indication of the clone picture at this point.

Step 9 Gradually build up the picture working from the building outwards keeping the textures light, your brush strokes should be following the direction of the building, never simply stroke the brush across the picture, always think about which way the brush strokes will look best. Once the whole picture has been lightly covered start to go over the buildings again, use the same opacity and this will slowly make the details more distinct. You can slightly increase the opacity if necessary, but it is generally better to allow the brush strokes to build the picture that way you have more control.

Figure 2.23

Painter X papers.

Figure 2.23

Painter X papers.

Figure 2.25

Increasing the density.

Figure 2.25

Increasing the density.

Step 10 Use the magnifier slider below the image to work at a bigger magnification, and then reduce the brush size to about 10.0 and paint over the building outlines making them more prominent. Increase the opacity to 10% and emphasize the shadow areas in the buildings. Figure 2.25 shows the picture at this stage.

Step 11 Experiment with different brush sizes and opacities to see how they affect the picture, try brush size 72 with 5% opacity and sweep over the main areas, this will bring more detail in and smooth out some of the irregularities caused by the brush strokes. One of the most difficult decisions is to know when to stop as it is easy to overwork a picture and bring back too much of the original image. Figure 2.26 shows the final picture.

In Chapters 5 and 6 paper textures will be explored in more detail, learning how to choose different papers and to alter them to suit the style of the picture.

Figure 2.26

St Conan s Kirk.

Figure 2.26

St Conan s Kirk.

Figure 2.27

Paper towel.

Figure 2.27

Paper towel.

Quick guide to selecting brushes Acrylic brushes Airbrushes Art Pen Brushes Artists' Oils Artists Blenders Calligraphy Chalk Charcoal Cloners

Colored Pencils

Conte

Crayons

Digital Watercolor

Distortion

Erasers

Felt Pens Gouache Image Hoze Impasto Liquid Ink Oil Pastels Oils

Palette Knives

Pastels

Pattern Pens

Pencils

Pens

Photo

RealBristle Brushes

Smart Stroke Brushes

Sponges

Sumi-e

Tinting

Watercolor

Brushes are at the heart of everything in the Painter program and it is the sheer volume of choice that confuses many first time users. This section covers the subject of brushes and every brush category in Painter X has two pages devoted to it. Each two-page spread has a short introduction to the category and a series of examples of some of the brush variants available.

There are two examples for each variant, the first showing how the brush stroke looks when cloned from a photograph and then another showing a close up detail of the same picture to illustrate the brush strokes more closely.

The examples shown on the following pages should prove helpful when deciding which brush to use for a particular image. If you look, for instance, at the first two categories, which are Acrylics and Airbrushes, you can immediately see that the Acrylics have a strong brushy texture, while the Airbrushes are quite different and show no brush marks. On the other hand, Chalks show grain texture extremely well. All the examples have been used at the default setting with just the cloning option changed. It is worth mentioning at this point that almost any brush can be changed into a cloner by clicking the Clone Color option in the Colors palette.

On the second page of each spread is a clone picture using one or more of the brush variants in the particular category to illustrate just one of the many ways in which the brushes can be used.

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