General Controls

Corel Painter provides extensive control over brush properties and dab types. You can also choose how brush strokes interact with existing color in the image. Some General controls work in conjunction with Expression settings. For more information about Expression settings, see "Expression Settings" on page 262.

Dab Types

Dab types are methods of media application. To produce "computed" brush strokes, Corel Painter uses rendered dab types that are computed during the stroke.

Earlier versions of Corel Painter used "dab-based" media application, in which brushes applied small dots of media to create brush strokes. With Spacing between dabs set small, strokes appear smooth. If you zoom in close enough, you can probably tell that the brush stroke is made up of tiny dabs of color. If you make a rapid brush stroke or set large spacing between dabs, strokes can become trails of dots.

Rendered dab types create continuous, smooth-edged strokes. They're fast and less prone to artifacts than dab-based media application. In fact, you can't draw fast enough to leave dabs or dots of color showing in a stroke, because they're just not there. Rendered dab types allow rich new features that were not possible with dab-based media application.

The Scratchboard Tool variant ofthe Pen brush category illustrates the smooth stroke that can be accomplished with the Corel Painter rendered Dab Types.

Corel Painter brushes use dab-based or rendered dab types:

Dab-based Dab Type Description

Circular

Dabs are controlled by the sliders in the Size and Angle areas of the Stroke Designer.

Single-Pixel

Consists of one pixel only. You can't change

its size. You use single-pixel brushes when

you zoom in for editing at the pixel level.

Static Bristle

Controlled by the sliders in the Size area of the Stroke Designer. When you select the Static Bristle dab type, the preview grid displays a bristly profile.

Captured Shapes that you create and capture. Refer to

"Capturing Brush Dabs" on page 265.

A captured dab is for a captured brush. It lets you paint with specific shapes and designs.

Rendered Dab Type Description

Camel Hair Creates bristle brushes with circular arrays of bristles. Individual brush hairs can have their own color and can pick up underlying colors independently of the Brush loading option. By increasing color variability in Corel Painter, you can make each hair a separate color. For more information, see "Setting Color Variability" on page 100.

The Feature slider in the Size area separates bristles. The higher the setting, the farther apart hairs appear. Using a low setting makes the strokes more solid. For more information about the Size controls, see "Size Controls" on page 216.

Flat

Creates flat brushes, like those used to apply paint to houses or walls. Brushes that use Flat dabs respond to bearing, allowing for flat or narrow strokes, depending on how the stylus is held. Flat dabs are always perpendicular to the shaft of the stylus.

The Feature setting in the Size area separates bristles.

Palette Knife

Create brushes that are the opposite of Flat dab brushes. With resaturation set low, you can use these brushes to scrape, push, pick up, or rapidly drag colors along. Palette Knife dabs are always parallel to the shaft of the stylus.

The Feature setting in the Size area separates bristles.

Bristle Spray

Creates brushes that can use airbrush controls. These brushes recognize tilt, which separates bristles on the opposite side of the tilt. Holding down Option + Shift (Mac OS) or Alt + Shift (Windows) reverses the spray direction when you paint.

By adjusting the Feature slider in the Size area, you can separate bristles.

Airbrush

Creates brushes that act like airbrushes. Bearing (direction) and angle (tilt) affect the eccentricity of the resulting conic section. The Feature slider in the Size area controls the size of the individual droplets of media. Setting the Feature slider too high might produce undesirable artifacts.

By holding down Option + Shift (Mac OS), or Alt + Shift (Windows), you can reverse the spray direction when you paint.

Pixel Airbrush

Creates brushes that work like airbrushes. Brushes that use Pixel Airbrush dabs cannot use the Feature slider to control the size of individual droplets of media. Holding down Option + Shift (Mac OS) or Alt + Shift (Windows) when painting reverses the spray direction.

Line Airbrush

Creates brushes that work like airbrushes. Brushes that use Line Airbrush dabs spray lines instead of droplets of media. By holding down Option + Shift (Mac OS), or Alt + Shift (Windows), you can reverse the spray direction when you paint.

Projected

Creates brushes that act like airbrushes. Brushes created with Projected dabs work similarly to the airbrush from previous versions of the application, but react to bearing and angle data. They create conic sections with an overall softness. By holding down Option + Shift (Mac OS), or Alt + Shift (Windows), you can reverse the spray direction when you paint.

Rendered

Creates brushes that conform the source to a stroke. Use the Source pop-up menu to control what is mapped into the computed brush strokes. For more information, see "Source, Opacity, and Grain Settings" on page 215.

The effects of Feature on the stroke.

The effects of Feature on the stroke.

• Liquid Ink dabs create liquid paint effects that simulate traditional ink-based media. You can give a Liquid Ink brush stroke the appearance of height by applying lighting effects. There are five types of Liquid Ink dab types: Liquid Ink Camel Hair, Liquid Ink Flat, Liquid Ink Palette Knife, Liquid Ink Bristle Spray, and Liquid Ink Airbrush.

• Watercolor dabs create brushes that work like watercolor brushes. The colors flow and mix and absorb into the paper. You can control the wetness and evaporation rate of the paper. There are five types of Watercolor dab types: Watercolor Camel Hair, Watercolor Flat, Watercolor Palette Knife, Watercolor Bristle Spray, and Watercolor Airbrush.

• Artists' Oil dabs produce brushes that work like real-world, high quality oil brushes.

To choose a dab type

1 On the Stroke Designer page of the Brush Creator, click General.

2 Choose a dab type from the Dab Type pop-up menu.

Stroke Types

Stroke type determines how media is applied during a brush stroke. Corel Painter brushes use one of the following stroke types. Some stroke types may be grayed out depending on the currently selected brush variant and dab type.

• The Single stroke type draws one dab path that corresponds exactly to your brush stroke.

You can use Static Bristle, Captured, or one of the bristly rendered dab types (such as Camel Hair) with the Single stroke type to create the effect of multiple bristles.

The Single stroke type has one dab path.

• The Multi stroke type draws a set of randomly distributed dab paths, positioned around the brush stroke you make. These dabs leave dab paths that are not parallel and might overlap. The Multi stroke type may produce different results each time you use it.

Increasing the Jitter value in the Random area spreads out the strokes in a multi-stroke brush.

Multi-stroke brushes must be precomputed, which can generate a delay in their appearance on the screen. Because of this delay, multi-stroke brushes work best when you apply them in short, controlled strokes.

The Multi stroke type draws a set of randomly distributed dab paths.

• The Rake stroke type draws a set of evenly distributed dab paths. The several dab paths in a rake brush stroke are parallel. You can control all other aspects of the stroke by using settings in the Rake area of the Stroke Designer.

Each bristle in a Rake brush can have a different color. Increasing Color Variability in Corel Painter causes bristles to be colored differently.

A rake stroke is composed of evenly distributed dab paths.

A rake stroke is composed of evenly distributed dab paths.

• The Hose stroke type applies only to the Image Hose. It's a single stroke composed of the current Image Hose Nozzle file. To learn more about the Image Hose and Nozzle files, refer to "Image Hose" on page 191.

The Hose stroke type uses the current Nozzle file as media. To choose a stroke type

1 On the Stroke Designer page of the Brush Creator, click General.

2 Choose a stroke type from the Stroke Type pop-up menu.

Methods and Subcategories

The brush method defines the most basic level of brush behavior and is the foundation on which all other brush variables build. You can think of the method and method subcategory as attributes of the stroke's appearance.

Because the method sets a brush variant's most basic behavior, you can alter a variant's behavior by changing its method. For example, suppose you want a stroke that looks like Charcoal, but instead of hiding underlying strokes, you want the brush strokes to build to black. You can get this effect by changing the method to Buildup. Perhaps you want a variant of the Pens brush category to smear underlying colors. You can change its method from Cover to Drip. Some brush effects are less easily affected by other methods, and results may differ.

Each method can have several variations, called method subcategories. These subcategories further refine the brush behavior. The following terms are used in describing most method subcategories:

• Soft methods produce strokes with feathered edges.

• Flat methods produce hard, aliased strokes with pixelated edges.

• Hard methods produce smooth strokes.

• Grainy methods produce brush strokes that react to paper texture.

• The words "edge" and "variable" are sometimes used to describe a method subcategory. "Edge" means that strokes are thick and sticky-looking. "Variable" means that a brush stroke is affected by tilt and direction.

Combining a method with a method subcategory results in a specific brush style that you can assign to a given brush. For example, Grainy Hard Coverbrush strokes interact with paper grain and are semi-anti-aliased so that they hide underlying pixels. Grainy Hard Cover is the default method for Chalk and Charcoal.

Grainy Hard Buildup was used to create the brush stroke on top. Soft Variable Buildup was used to create the stroke on the bottom.

Corel Painter supplies the following methods:

The Buildup methods produce brush strokes that build toward black as you overlay them. A real-world example of buildup is the felt pen: scribble on the page with blue, then scribble on top of that with green, and then red. The scribbled area keeps getting darker, approaching black. Even if you were to apply a bright color like yellow, you couldn't lighten the scribble — it would stay dark. Crayons and Felt Pens are buildup brushes.

An example ofthe Buildup method.

An example ofthe Buildup method.

The Cover methods produce brush strokes that cover underlying strokes, as oil paint does in a traditional art studio. No matter what colors you use, you can always apply a layer of paint that completely hides what's underneath. Even with a black background, a thick layer of yellow remains pure yellow. Some Chalk and Pen variants are examples of brushes that use the Cover method.

An example ofthe Cover method.

An example ofthe Cover method.

The Eraser methods erase, lighten, darken, or smear the underlying colors.

An example of the Eraser method.

An example of the Eraser method.

The Drip methods interact with the underlying colors to distort the image.

An example ofthe Drip method.

An example ofthe Drip method.

You do not normally need to use the Mask method, because the masking capabilities of Corel Painter are provided by the Cover method. The Mask method is provided only for compatibility with earlier versions of the application.

The Cloning methods take images from a clone source and re-create them in another location, often rendering them in a Natural-Media style. For more information about cloning images, refer to "Cloning Images" on page 273.

The image on the left was created with a brush that used the image on the right as the clone source.

Plug-in is a special category of method subcategories. It defines no specific brush behavior, but is an open door to a wide range of subcategories.

It's well worth your time to browse through the Plug-in method subcategories. There, you'll find methods such as Left Twirl, which gives you a brush with the dab and stroke of an Impressionist performing left-handed twirls.

You can give any built-in brush the power ofa plug-in by changing its method andsubcategory.

The Wet method applies brush strokes to a Watercolor layer. For more information, see "Working with the Watercolor Layer" on page 170.

The Digital Wet method applies digital watercolor brush strokes to the canvas or a regular layer. For more information, see "Working with Digital Watercolor" on page 172.

To choose a method and subcategory

1 On the Stroke Designer page of the Brush Creator, click General.

2 Choose a method from the Method pop-up menu.

3 Choose a subcategory from the Subcategory pop-up menu.

Source, Opacity, and Grain Settings

The Source setting specifies the media that is applied by the brush variant. Source applies only to some dab types, such as Line Airbrush, Projected, and Rendered. Refer to "Painting with Color" on page 149 for more information about setting a media source.

Corel Painter brushes use one of the following source types:

• Color applies primary or secondary color.

• Gradient applies the current gradient across the length of the stroke.

• Gradient Repeat applies the current gradient repeatedly along the stroke.

• Pattern paints with a pattern containing no mask information.

• Pattern With Mask paints with a pattern limited by the pattern's mask.

• Pattern As Opacity paints a pattern in which the luminance of the pattern becomes the opacity of the stroke.

The Opacity slider determines how Corel Painter should vary the density of the media being applied. It sets the maximum opacity of the selected brush. The opacity of an Airbrush variant is often set to be determined by stylus pressure. Heavier pressure produces more opaque strokes. You can use the Expressions settings on the Stroke Designer page to link opacity to stylus or mouse data.

The Grain slider determines the maximum amount of paper texture that Corel Painter should reveal in a brush stroke. Some default variants have their grain component determined by pressure. Increasing pressure causes the pencil to "dig into" the paper. You can use the Expressions settings on the Stroke Designer page to link grain to stylus or mouse data. You can also use the paper's brightness and contrast settings to control brush-grain interaction. For more information, see "Using Paper Texture" on page 113.

To choose a media source

1 On the Stroke Designer page of the Brush Creator, click General.

2 Choose a source from the Source pop-up menu.

To set brush opacity

1 On the Stroke Designer page of the Brush Creator, click General.

2 Move the Opacity slider to the left to reduce opacity, or to the right to increase opacity.

To set grain

1 On the Stroke Designer page of the Brush Creator, click General.

2 Move the Grain slider to the left to reduce the penetration into the grain. Move it to the right to increase the penetration.

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